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Fishing in the Hauraki Gulf #travel #NewZealand

A favorite activity – for hubby, at any rate – is to go fishing. We’re blessed with many choices of fishing spots in Auckland. Usually hubby tags along with his brother and they go fishing somewhere in the Hauraki Gulf.

Fishing

Here are some friends that decided to tag along.

Fishing dolphins

They like to play and take a good look. Must be a spectator sport…

Fishing scenery

When they overnight on the boat, they tuck into sheltered bays near one of the many islands in the Hauraki Gulf.

Fishing mooring

Lots of neighbors to chat with…

Fishing Allen

Then there is the fishing. The ones that got away…

Fishing Paul

And the ones that didn’t.

Do you like to fish? If so, where is your favorite fishing spot?

F is for Fishing

F

New Zealanders love their boats and fishing. Fishing is a reasonably cheap activity since you don’t need a licence, except if you want to fish for fresh-water fish such as trout.

My husband’s family are all very keen fishermen. Me—not so much. I think the sport is cruel and I always feel very sorry for the fish. Not that my feelings stop hubby’s interest in the hobby. He goes out as often as he can. All of these photos were taken on the Hauraki Gulf, not far from Auckland.

Hammerhead Shark

This is a hammerhead shark, and it was released after this photo was taken.

Baby shark

Another shark—a different variety this time—released again after the photo.

Hubby Fishing

Busy fishing. The island in the background is the dormant volcano, Rangitoto. It’s an Auckland landmark.

Hubby with Fish

Hubby with some of his catch.

SIL Fishing

And my sister-in-law with her catch.

Do you like to fish?

Alaska, A Slice of Paradise

Today I’m turning back the clock and making a return trip to Alaska. I loved Alaska. It reminded me of a frontier town – how I imagine America used to be before it became settled. The scenery is gorgeous, the towns few and far between and the locals are friendly, especially if you’re a female. Ladies, if you’re looking for a husband there are lots of single men in Alaska!

We spent about two weeks in Alaska. We traveled down to the Kenai Peninsula then up to Denali National Park and up as far as Fairbanks. We also did a cruise down the coast to take in some of the towns only accessible via water.

I have memories of HUGE mosquitoes (laughingly referred to as the state bird) and long, long days. In Fairbanks, hubby and friends played golf at midnight because it never got dark.

Along the way, we stopped at towns that were dots on the map and full of friendly locals. From memory wet T-shirt competitions were very popular in the pubs.

Here are a selection of photos:

Glacier Alaska

This is Bear Glacier. I love the blue ice. Very pretty.

Ketchikan Alaska

Ketchikan, Alaska. This town is only accessible by boat.

Anchorage Fishing

A salmon fishing contest in Anchorage.

Anchorage Salmon

A determined angler with his prize, Anchorage.

Hyder Alaska

Hyder, a small town near the border with Canada.

Hyder ghost Town

Bears, Alaska

Bears, near Whitehorse, Yukon, Canada. Not far from Alaskan border.

Mr Munro and I hope to make a return trip one day. It’s a beautiful spot.

Have you ever visited Alaska? Have the desire to visit?

Fishing up New Zealand.

I enjoy some of the Maori myths and legends. This one, telling of Maui and the birth of New Zealand, is one of my favorites. As with all legends, there are a few variations.

Maui was a demi-god who possessed magical powers. Not all his family knew of his magical powers, and he used this to his advantage.

One day, he hid in the bottom of his brothers’ boat in order to go out fishing with them. Once out at sea, Maui was discovered by his brothers, however they weren’t able to take him back to shore because Maui made use of his magic powers and made the shoreline seem farther away than it was in reality.

The brothers continued rowing, and once they were far out into the ocean Maui dropped his magic fishhook over the side of the waka (canoe). After a while he felt a strong tug on the line. This seemed to be too strong a tug to be any ordinary fish, and Maui called to his brothers for assistance.

After much straining and physical effort, up surfaced Te Ika a Maui (the fish of Maui), known today as the North Island of New Zealand. Maui told his brothers that the Gods might be angry about this, and he asked them to wait while he went to placate the Gods.

However, once Maui had gone his brothers began to argue about the ownership of this new land. They took out their weapons and started pounding away at the catch. The blows on the land created the many mountains and valleys of the North Island today.

The South Island is known as Te Waka a Maui (the waka of Maui). Stewart Island, which lies at the very bottom of New Zealand, is known as Te Punga a Maui (Maui’s anchor), as it was the anchor holding Maui’s waka as he pulled in the giant fish.

So, there you have it – the story of the origin of New Zealand.

Do you have a favorite myth or legend?

Today it’s my turn to blog at The Danger Zone. Check out my post about my adventures in Rwanda while viewing the mountain gorillas.