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Recipe: Ginger Biscotti #recipe #baking

Biscotti

This is another recipe from Annabel Langbein’s Simple Pleasures. I’ve been working my way through this book and found dozens of tempting recipes to try. This one for ginger biscotti was a real winner. I’ve tried biscotti recipes before, but this one was the best of all. Hubby said so!

Ingredients:

2 1/2 cups self-raising flour

1 1/2 cups castor sugar

3 eggs

1 teaspoon ground ginger

1/2 cup chopped crystallized ginger

Method:

1. Preheat the oven to 180C and line a tray with baking paper.

2. Mix ingredients together until you have a soft dough. Pat into a log shape – around 23 cm x 7 cm and place onto the tray.

3. Cook until the log is a pale golden color – about 30 minutes.

4. Remove from the oven and decrease the temperature to 140C.

5. Let the log cool until you can cut it without burning your fingers. Slice thinly and arrange on a tray.

6. Bake again until crisp and dry. This should take about 15 – 20 minutes, but the biscuits will become crisper as they cool.

7. Once completely cool store in an airtight container.

Ginger Biscotti

Shelley’s Notes:

1. As usual, my cooking time was less since my oven is on the hot side.

2. I’ll use this recipe and experiment with some different flavors, maybe cranberries and chocolate.

3. This recipe really worked well, and the biscotti were perfect with a cup of tea.

Ginger and Pepper Biscuits

I found this recipe when I was flicking through a cook book by Allyson Gofton, a chef who used to be a familiar face on New Zealand television. The combination of ginger and pepper sounded interesting, and I decided to give them a try. The result was a crisp and moreish biscuit (that’s cookie to you Americans) that goes perfectly with a cup of tea or coffee. I’ll definitely be making this recipe again.

Ginger Pepper Biscuits

Ginger and Pepper Biscuits

2 1/2 cups flour

1 teaspoon baking powder

4 teaspoons ground ginger

3/4 teaspoons mixed spice

1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper

250 grams (8 ounces/1/2 pound) butter

1 cup sugar

1 egg, lightly beaten

1/4 cup of golden syrup or treacle

2 Tablespoons finely grated fresh ginger

1 teaspoon vinegar (I only had spiced vinegar in the cupboard so that’s what I used)

extra sugar for sprinkling

Instructions:

1. Heat the oven to 180C (350F)

2. Line two baking trays with baking paper

3. Cream the butter and sugar until light and creamy then add the egg, golden syrup, fresh ginger and vinegar.

4. Sift the flour, baking powder, ground ginger, mixed spice and cayenne pepper into the mixture, combine and chill the mixture in the fridge for 30 minutes.

5. Place the additional sugar in a small bowl.

6. Roll biscuits into teaspoonful size balls and roll in the sugar bowl. Flatten a fraction and finish the flattening with a fork.

7. Bake for 15 minutes or until lightly golden.

8. Cool before storing in an airtight tin.

Shelley’s notes:

1. Ms. Gofton also suggests coating half the cooked biscuits with dark chocolate or pressing a piece of crystallized ginger or a hazelnut in the top of each biscuit before you cook them. You could also sandwich them together with frosting if you wanted to.

2. The biscuits are very gingery and have a slight “bite”. Hubby liked them as much as me.

Oaty Ginger Crunch

When I was a child my father used to receive a gift of crystalized ginger, dried fruit and nuts every Christmas. I hated, and still dislike, the dried figs component, and I wasn’t very keen on the ginger either. That has changed over time, and as I’ve grown older I’ve come to enjoy crystalized ginger.

When my mind turns to baking, ginger has become my favorite. This recipe is a twist on Ginger Crunch. I like the addition of porridge oats (oatmeal) and coconut to the traditional recipe. The oats make it feel healthier somehow, Smile

Ginger Crunch 

Ingredients:

15o grams/5 oz butter

2 Tablespoons golden syrup

3/4 cup brown sugar

1 cup coconut

1 1/2 cups rolled oats (oatmeal)

1 cup white flour

1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder

2 teaspoons ground ginger

1/2 cup of finely chopped crystalized ginger

Method:

1. Preheat the oven to 180C/350F. Line your slice tin (20 cm x 30 cm)

2. Melt the butter, golden syrup and brown sugar in a saucepan, stirring the mixture occasionally. Remove from heat once the butter is all melted.

3. Mix all the dry ingredients together in a bowl and make a well in the center.

4. Add the melted butter mix to the flour and mix until combined.

5. Press the mix into your lined tin and bake for 15 – 20 minutes.

 

Frosting:

150 grams/5 oz butter

2 – 2 1/2 cups of icing sugar/confectioner’s sugar

2 tablespoons golden syrup

1 1/2 tablespoons ground ginger

1. Combine butter, golden syrup, ginger and 2 cups of the icing sugar in a saucepan and heat until the butter melts. Stir constantly. If the frosting is too running gradually add the other 1/2 a cup of icing sugar until it is a workable consistency.

2. Pour frosting over the cooled baked slice.

3. If you’re a ginger fan, sprinkle more chopped crystallized ginger and some pistachio nuts on top for decoration.

Shelley’s notes:

This is a delicious slice, and I find it very moreish.

Are you a fan of ginger?

Recipe: Ginger Oat Slice

Ginger Oat Slice

This is a new to me recipe from Robyn Martin’s book called Bake.

Ingredients:

150 grams butter (5 oz)

1/4 cup golden syrup

1/2 cup brown sugar

1/2 cup coconut

1 1/2 cups wholegrain oats (that’s oatmeal to Americans)

1/2 cup wholemeal flour

1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder

2 teaspoons ground ginger

Method:

1. Melt the butter, golden syrup and sugar in a saucepan until the butter is melted.

2. Place the coconut, oats, flour, baking powder and ginger in a bowl and add the butter mixture.

3. Combine well.

4. Line a 20 x 30 cm tin with baking paper then press mixture into the tin.

5. Bake at 180C/350F for 20 minutes or until golden.

6. Mark into squares while still warm.

Shelley’s Notes:

1. My final result looked nothing like the picture in the recipe book. It tasted great, but I’m at a loss to explain the difference.

2. The square tasted good, but when I make it again, I think I’ll reduce the sugar a little. It was quite sweet.

3. I put a little lemon icing (frosting) on top – a sort of a drizzle – and that was a nice combination.

Have you tried any new recipes recently?

Recipe: Ginger Slice

This is a recipe I discovered in an Australian cookbook titled Country Women’s Association, Biscuits and Slices. I’m such a fan of ginger and simply had to try making the slice. The results were excellent, and it’s one that I’ll make again in the future. The scent of the different spices as the slice cooks is gorgeous.

Ginger Slice

Ginger Slice

1 cup white sugar

2 tablespoons golden syrup

125 g butter/half cup butter

pinch of salt

1 dessertspoon ground cinnamon

1 dessertspoon ground ginger

1 teaspoon mixed spice

1 egg, well-beaten

1 cup sour milk (make this by adding a squeeze of lemon juice to a cup of fresh milk)

2 cups plain flour

1 teaspoon baking soda

1 cup chopped raisins

Method:

1. Preheat the oven to 180C/350F

2. Combine the sugar, golden syrup, butter, salt and all spices into a large saucepan and heat until the ingredients are melted and combined together.

3. Add the beaten egg and the sour mix. Combine well.

4. Sift the flour and soda and stir into mixture.

5. Add the raisins.

6. Place in a paper lined slice tin.

7. Bake for 30 minutes.

Ginger Slice

Shelley’s notes:

1. My oven cooks quickly, and I cooked my slice for 25 minutes.

2. The combination of raisins didn’t work for me, so I left them out.

3. Slice into squares and serve for afternoon tea or serve warm for dessert with whipped cream, creme fraiche, or custard.

Talking Gingerly

Thursday Thirteen

I’ve been thinking about ginger recently, mainly because in our local reality show, Nestle’s Hottest Home Baker, most of the contestants used ginger when they cooked their signature dishes last week. I like ginger and decided it would make a great topic for my Thursday Thirteen.

Thirteen Things About Ginger

1. Ginger is the rhizome (mass of roots) of a flowering plant which is native to South-East Asia. Ginger has been grown in China for thousands of years.

2. Ginger can be purchased fresh, dried or ground. My father loves crystallized ginger, which is often available around Christmas.

3. Fresh ginger has a fresh citrus-like smell and flavor, along with a little hotness. It’s used in Chinese, Caribbean and Indian dishes. Dried ginger root is used in preserves and chutneys. Powdered ginger is used in cakes, biscuits and cookies.

4. A clever hint – keep your fresh ginger root in the freezer. When you require some ginger in a dish, grate the frozen root and return to the freezer. Hubby and I have way less wastage this way. It really works!

5. Ginger – a slang word for a red-head. A human, characterized by pale skin, freckles and bright red hair.

6. Ginger is considered to have aphrodisiac powers when taken either internally or externally. It’s actually mentioned in the Karma Sutra.

7. In the Phillipines, ginger is said to expel evil spirits. The people chew on chunks of ginger and I presume the evil spirits leave.

8. Ginger is a well-known digestive aid because it increases saliva and digestive fluids. Some people say ginger helps with morning sickness. At the onset of nausea, the mother chews on a piece of ginger root. Some people swear ginger helps with motion sickness as well. I’ve heard some bus drivers hand out ginger sweets to school children to stop them from throwing up. At least that’s what the man at the ginger factory in Australia told me.

9. Queen Elizabeth 1 is credited with the invention of gingerbread men.

10. Fresh ginger is found in the produce section of most grocery stores. Look for smooth skin with a fresh, spicy fragrance. Tubers should be firm and feel heavy.

11. My favorite non-alcoholic summer drink is ginger beer. Ginger beer was first made in England during the mid-17th century.

12. You can make your own ginger beer by growing a ginger plant. It’s not an actual plant but is made from yeast.

13. Henry VIII thought ginger would stop people from getting the plague. He instructed the mayor to use ginger as a plague medicine.

Visit the Thursday Thirteen Hub

Do you like ginger? What is your favorite way to eat ginger?