Adventure into Romance with Shelley Munro
News About Shelley Blog Books Extras Contact Small Font Large Font

Archive for 'Interplanetary Love'

Bargains…One, Two, Free!

April Showers Super Sale & Giveaway

art Spring Blooming; spring flowers on wooden background

 

☆҉➹☆Check out the April Showers Super Sale & Giveaway! ☆҉➹☆҉
36 Romance Authors are offering 63 novels. Plus enter to win one of 3 Kindles or a 5 $25 Amazon Gift Cards.

http://lovekissedbookbargains.com/reader-rewards-sales-giveaway

Interplanetary Love on Sale for 99c

My tongue-in-cheek sci-fi romance, Interplanetary Love, is on sale for 99c. Normally $2.99, grab it today for 99c. Amazon only.

My Scarlet Woman – Free at

All Romance ebooks

My Scarlet Woman is free at All Romance ebooks for one more day. All Romance ebooks also has a 50% Earth Day rebate for today only. You can grab many of my books at a bargain price or one of your other favorite authors.

Let Me Tell You About Sexy Thoughts!

My Sexy Saturday

This week’s theme is Their Sexy Thoughts. When characters think about each other in a sexy, exciting way, we as readers adore them. We love hearing about how the hero thinks the heroine is sexy and loving and oh so much more as the story progresses. As writers, we love putting those words down and getting them just right.

I thought I’d give you a short scene in the heroine’s point of view. She’s arrived at the space port to meet her date, one arranged via the Interplanetary Love dating agency. As in all the best romances, things don’t go quite as she expected…

Carly noticed the man straightaway. So did every other female in the spaceport, but his attention remained on the petite beauty at his side. He didn’t appear to detect the heated whispers and come-hither looks from other women. A pang of envy pierced Carly. He was taller than her own six foot and dressed completely in black. He’d slicked back his black hair and the style showcased the angles and shadows of his face. The curves of his sensuous lips looked perfect for kissing.

Sighing, she turned her attention to the woman. Lucky lady, Carly thought as her gaze strayed to the man again to steal another hit of his hot sensuality. A shiver slid down her spine, delicious and naughty. Better than a morning shot of java.

A woman just had to look at this man to know he’d be great in the sack. It was the way he held himself, the way he walked, all languid and lazy. It was in the charming smile and the dimples winking at the corners of his mouth, which muted the first tough-guy impression. Carly resisted the need to fan herself. Oh yes. She wanted one of him in every flavor.

“Carly!” a voice shrieked. “You came.”

Carly gaped as the petite woman who’d walked in with Mr. Hunk opened her arms and ran toward her. It was like a romantic scene from a corny movie—one lover racing toward another—and all Carly could think was she’d ticked the box specifying a heterosexual male.

She was sure of it.

Interplanetary Love

Taking love to another planet

I know your secret…

Ekim Ramuk is a vid-star on the planet Nidni. Along with fame and currency comes his reputation as Nidni’s greatest lover—one that causes him acute embarrassment and anxiety because not one of the rumors is true.

Carly Abercombie is an Earth cop who works long hours and craves a man to hold her in the small hours of the night. She doesn’t require perfect. Mr. Almost Perfect will do, but finding him—that’s another problem entirely. In desperation, she signs up with Interplanetary Love and heads off to Nidni to meet her first date.

Rala Ramuk, Ekim’s baby sister, has problems of her own. Her brother! Determined to marry him off so she can move forward with her own life, according to Goddess Peti’s rules, she’s signed Ekim up with the Interplanetary Love dating agency. Anything to secure her future.

A vid-star, a cop and a matchmaker. Three strong personalities, all determined to win. Let the dice roll and the fun begin…

Warning: This book contains a tongue-in-cheek plot, a little purple-tinged prose and a man-part named Rajah. You have been warned.

Purchase links: Amazon| All Romance| iBooks US| iBooks NZ| Kobo| Barnes & Noble

To visit more My Sexy Saturday snippets follow the links below:

Taking Love to Another Planet!

Interplanetary Love is my new release. It’s now live at all online retailers.

 

IPLove600x900

Here’s the blurb:

Taking love to another planet

I know your secret…

Ekim Ramuk is a vid-star on the planet Nidni. Along with fame and currency comes his reputation as Nidni’s greatest lover—one that causes him acute embarrassment and anxiety because not one of the rumors is true.

Carly Abercombie is an Earth cop who works long hours and craves a man to hold her in the small hours of the night. She doesn’t require perfect. Mr. Almost Perfect will do, but finding him—that’s another problem entirely. In desperation, she signs up with Interplanetary Love and heads off to Nidni to meet her first date.

Rala Ramuk, Ekim’s baby sister, has problems of her own. Her brother! Determined to marry him off so she can move forward with her own life, according to Goddess Peti’s rules, she’s signed Ekim up with the Interplanetary Love dating agency. Anything to secure her future.

A vid-star, a cop and a matchmaker. Three strong personalities, all determined to win. Let the dice roll and the fun begin…

Warning: This book contains a tongue-in-cheek plot, a little purple-tinged prose and a man-part named Rajah. You have been warned.

Purchase links:

Amazon| All Romance| iBooks US| iBooks NZ| Kobo| Barnes & Noble|

Gobbledygook

One of the people I correspond with is an aspiring writer and she asked me about language in sci-fi romances. She was having problems with words to describe things in her sci-fi work that didn’t sound plain stupid. She wanted to know how I attack this aspect of world building to give my work a sci-fi flavor and particularly mentioned my Talking Dog series, which is one of her favorites. I thought this was a great question and decided it would make an excellent topic for a blog post.

From childhood, I’ve watched sci-fi movies and television. I’ve seen how the writers have handled the language aspect and absorbed that. While I’ve never been a huge sci-fi/fantasy reader, I’ve read enough to see how other writers work this aspect of world building. I think the most important thing is to make sure the reader isn’t jerked out of your story because they’re so busy laughing about your made-up language or are totally confused because they don’t understand what is happening in the story. On the other hand, the writer shouldn’t copy everything they’ve seen or read in other sci-fi books or movies. Originality is good.

With my Talking Dogs series, I went light on the “foreign” language aspect. My stories are about aliens crash landing in New Zealand. Just as an aside, a lot of the time my editor and readers think I’m writing a foreign language anyway!

Hinekiri, the aunt, is a seasoned traveler/explorer. She’s good with languages and doesn’t stand out as a tourist. Janaya, the niece who stowed away to save her aunt, had a crash course with some Earth-speak tapes and she sometimes mixes up things when it comes to language. Here’s an example.

“Back on the ship,” she snapped to her aunt as she pulled her weapon free. “Now.”

To her right, the leaves of a fern shuddered. Janaya scented the air. Sweat. Torgon sweat.

“Come on out with your fingers poked inside your ears,” she ordered, aiming her neutralizing weapon at the dark green bushes that had moved.

“That would be, hands in the air,” her aunt said.

With my Talking Dogs, I focused more on the language difficulties, the same ones that people learning English have. With my stories this made sense because my aliens want to blend rather than stand out.

I gave the race of bad aliens (who are a pretty lilac color) the name of Torgons, the planet where Hinekiri and Janaya come from is called Dalcon, and I had a few other things with made up names. As I said, with this book I erred on the light side because it is set in New Zealand and I wanted my aliens to blend.

Foreign languages and scientific names for plants or animals can be a good source of language for sci-fi works. Authors can also use part of these words because some of them are really long while a few of the syllables work out perfectly as a made up language.

With my free story, Interplanetary Love, I used a completely different technique. I took normal English words and spelled them backward, making a new language all of my own. With Fallen Idol, I made up words, plucking them from the depths of my brain and that worked out okay.

With all my writing, I tend to err on the light side when it comes to a “foreign” language. I’ve read books where I’ve had to read the same paragraph several times to work out what the author or the characters were trying to say. I think this part of world building is a delicate balance because if you have too many strange words you frustrate your readers and if you don’t have enough you might as well write a contemporary. If anything, I’m probably on the too light side, but I can live with that. I write what I prefer to read.

Writers, what do you think? How do you tackle this part of world building when you’re writing a paranormal, sci-fi or fantasy story?

Readers, what do you think? Do writers get it right or do we confuse you? Is there a writer who you think does a really good job?