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13 Things About the Mystery Genre

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Today, in honor of the contest below, my TT is all about mysteries and mystery writing.

Thirteen Things About The Mystery Genre

1. Mysteries as we know them, weren’t available to the reading public until Edgar Allen Poe introduced his fictional detective, Auguste C. Dupin in 1841.

2. His book, The Murders in the Rue Morgue, is an example of a locked room mystery. This is where the murder victim is discovered inside a sealed enclosure of some description.

3. Katherine Anne Green became the first woman to write and publish a detective mystery in 1878. Her book featured a detective who investigated a murder that occurred within a small group of people.

4. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle introduced Sherlock Holmes and his friend Doctor Watson in 1887.

5. The golden age of mystery fiction arrived in the 1920s.

6. Agatha Christie is probably the most famous mystery writer with 50 plus books to her name.

7. Police procedurals entered the market in the 1940s.

8. Some of the most popular mysteries have been written for children such as the Nancy Drew Mysteries, the Hardy Boys, Famous Five and Secret Seven.

9. The mystery genre is a popular one, and there are many subgenres including cozy mysteries, hard-boiled detective, police procedural, whodunits, capers and some mysteries drift toward thrillers.

10. It’s said that the lack of mystery fiction before the 1800s occurred because there was no organized police force.

11. Fictional detectives usually fall into four categories: amateur, private investigator, police detective and forensic specialists.

12. Sherlock Holmes is very popular at present with two television series featuring modern retellings. There is Sherlock and Elementary. Other detectives such as Agatha Christie’s Poirot and Miss Marple have also made our screen.

13. My favorite on screen mystery show is Miss Fisher’s Murder Mysteries featuring Phryne Fisher. It’s set in the late 1920s and is based on Australian Kerry Greenwood’s books.

Are you a mystery reader, and if so, which type do you prefer? Do you have a favorite series?

Sources: http://kids.mysterynet.com

CONTEST: Whether you’re a mystery reader or not, I hope you’ll enter the Not Your Usual Suspects mystery contest below. Complete the rafflecopter below to enter the draw to win a mystery.

a Rafflecopter giveaway

13 Mistakes I made on the way to publication by Martha O’Sullivan

I’d like to welcome a special guest today – Martha O’Sullivan. Like me, she is a writer, and today she’s talking about mistakes she made on the road to publication. I’ve made some of the same mistakes. Have you? Over to Martha…

Thursday Thirteen

13 Mistakes I made on the way to publication by Martha O’Sullivan

1. I thought I needed an agent.

2. I thought I had to go through traditional publishing and print channels.

3. I thought Harlequin ruled the world.

4. I should have brought The Emotion Thesaurus by Angela Ackerman and Becca Puglist before I wrote my first book instead of when I was editing my second.

5. I underestimated how generous, supportive and welcoming writers were.

6. I should have gone to RWA Nationals the year I started writing. I should have joined TARA from the get-go.

7. I should have kept reading. I started writing at night instead of reading.

8. I should always write the last chapter first. I should have known this since I find myself reading the last few pages of a book midway through chapter two.

9. I should have joined a critique group.

10. I should have shouted that I was writing from the rooftops instead of keeping it to myself.

11. I should have known the last rejection hurts just as much as the first one.

12. I should have known that writing the book was the easy part.

13. I knew how bad I wanted it, so I should have known I would do it.

But the one thing I did right? I never gave up! And here I am!

Have you made any mistakes during your writing journey? Are there things you would have done differently?

The Chances Trilogy by Martha O’Sullivan

Second Chance Chance Encounter last chance cov

Second Chance, the Chances trilogy opener, is a reunion/love triangle romance that keeps the shores of Lake Tahoe blazing hot long after the sultry summer sun has set. Chance Encounter, the trilogy’s second installment, heats up San Francisco’s chilly days and blustery nights with white-hot passion and pulse-pounding suspense. And in Last Chance, the conclusion of the trilogy, the snow-packed Sierras melt into lust-fueled puddles despite the single-digit temperatures of the Lake Tahoe winter.

Please visit Martha’s web site at www.marthaosullivan26.wix.com/marthaosullivan for excerpts, reviews and more.

The Chances trilogy by Martha O’Sullivan (http://twitter.com/@m_osullivan26)  available at: www.marthaosullivan26.wix.com/marthaosullivan

http://eredsage.com/store/OSULLIVAN_MARTHA.html Also available on: Amazon, BN.com, AllRomanceEbooks, Kobo Books and Bookstrand

BIO:

Martha O’Sullivan has loved reading romance novels for as long as she can remember. So much so that she would continue the story in her head long after the last chapter was read. Writing her own novels is the realization of a lifelong dream for this stay-at-home mom. Martha writes contemporary and erotic romances with traditional couples and happy endings. She is the author of the Chances trilogy available now from Red Sage Publishing. Her current work-in-progress is a sweet and steamy Christmas novel set in Florida. A native Chicagoan, she lives her own happy ending in Tampa with her husband and two daughters.

13 Facts About Color Therapy

Thursday Thirteen

I like color in my life, and if I’m ever feeling down, something colorful always cheers me up. Some people swear by color therapy, so I thought I’d do a little research into the subject.

Thirteen Facts About Color Therapy

1. Color therapists believe that each of the seven colors of the rainbow relate to a chakra in the human body.

2. Light moves in waves and each wave varies in length. Because each color has a different wave length, we humans can discern the range of colors.

3. The color therapist looks at a person’s health and their mood and treats the corresponding chakra. i.e. where the ailment is located.

4. The treatment can consist of colored lights, which are beamed onto the afflicted part of the body.

5. Or sometimes colored silks are worn instead of using the colored lights.

6. In 1958, US scientist Robert Gerard conducted a study and concluded that red stimulates and makes us anxious, while blue promotes calm.

7. He also showed that colour could affect the appetite, blood pressure and have a bearing on aggression.

8. Ancient Egyptian scrolls tell of using color therapy to cure various ailments. Also ancient Chinese texts have mentioned color therapy.

9. During the 20th century color therapy came into its own. The Swiss psychologist Dr Max Lüscher developed the Lüscher-Colour-Diagnostic test. The recipient selects eight coloured bottles in order of preference. The results are said to reveal your worries and their solution.

10. Color treatment is safe because it’s non evasive and is able to be used on any age group.

11. After a session, the recipients are said to feel empowered and full of life.

12. The long winters in the Northern hemisphere often make people feel depressed and the use of lights is a proven cure.

13. Darkness results in the production of melatonin which is conducive to healing and a long life. If the melatonin production does not cease with the introduction of light then lethargy and depression can occur.

Source: International Association of Color

While a part of me remains skeptical, the use of color and light does make my mood lift. I like wearing my bright red shoes or my turquoise moccasins, and I like getting outside into the daylight at least once a day. Staying indoors makes me start to feel antsy.

Have you tried color therapy? Does color lift your mood?

Thirteen Facts About January

Thursday Thirteen

When I was wondering about a topic for my thirteen this week, I started thinking about beginnings. January is the beginning of the year, and I thought that would make a great topic.

Thirteen Facts About The Month of January

1. January is named after the Roman god Janus, a god said to have two heads. He looks back to the last year and forward to the new one.

2. The birthstone for January is garnet, which is said to represent constancy.

3. The flower for January is carnation.

4. The stars signs of Capricorn (Dec 22 – Jan 19) and Aquarius (Jan 20 – Feb 18) fall in January.

5. A Northern hemisphere January is the seasonal equivalent of July in the Southern hemisphere.

6. It’s national Thank You month.

7. Saxons sometimes called January the wolf month because hungry wolves would prowl towns searching for food during this month.

8. January is the only month when the North Pole is usually colder than the South pole.

9. January always begins on the same day as October, except during a leap year.

10. The polish word for January is Stycznia, which comes from the word joining. It joins the old year to the new one.

11. According to US census information, January is fairly popular as a girl’s name. It comes in at around 3200th most popular.

12. Originally the Roman calendar ran from March to December. Names for January and February were added later.

13. Mr Munro was born in January – on 8 January to be precise. The same day as Elvis, he likes to remind me.

Are you a fan of January?

I’m Watching You

Camera Critters

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Mr. Munro took this photo at the Auckland zoo. When we visited Africa we saw quite a few hippos. We stayed at one camping ground by a waterhole where they came out at night and grazed by our tents. The hippo is considered one of the most dangerous animals in Africa, and the worst thing you can do is to get between a hippo and water or a hippo and its offspring.

To see more animal photos visit Camera Critters.

Play Time

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This photo of two otters playing was taken at Bear Country in South Dakota. They were having a fine old time and enjoying the sun.

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To see more animal photos visit Camera Critters.

A Day in the Life

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“Careful! Watch the knot. Do I have to go to work today?”

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“Can’t we go faster?”

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“Ah! Dinner time at last.”

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“And maybe time for a snooze.”

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These photos were taken at our local farmers’ market where they give pony rides to the children. To visit more animal photos follow the links at Camera Critters.

I’m On Strike!

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This photo was taken at Bear Country in South Dakota, USA. Mr. Munro and I loved watching the bears because some of them were real characters. This one wasn’t letting any traffic past.

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To see more photos visit Camera Critters.