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Archive for the 'Writing Tip' Category

Writer Tip: Crystal Jordan

“My biggest tip to any writer is to write consistently. I used to say people should write every day, but if you miss a day or two, the guilt starts snowballing. So, now I just say you need to make writing a habit that you stick with. If it’s a habit, you train yourself into needing to do it, and the only way to finish a story is to write. Nothing else will get you there, so make sure to make time for it, even if it means using a pad of paper and pen in the car while you’re waiting the ten minutes for the kids to get out of school.”

Visit Crystal Jordan’s website at www.crystaljordan.com
Purchase Crystal’s next release, In the Heat of the Night

Writer Tip: Sarah Mayberry

“I always read when I’m writing – Stephen King calls it “refilling the word well” – and I often re-read my favorite authors and my favorite books. Finding a chapter or scene I love and really analysing how the author put their sentences and descriptions and paragraphs together has given me some of my best writing lessons over the years. Staying open to new ways of doing things and looking at my own work keeps the writing interesting and challenging for me, and hopefully for my readers.”

Visit Sarah Mayberry’s website
Purchase Sarah’s latest release, Her Best Friend

Writer Tip: Sandra Hyatt

“Have faith in your own story and your own process. When I first started writing I heard talks from authors who’d written practically since they could hold a pencil, and I heard about authors who plotted out entire stories before they wrote a single manuscript word. I, on the other hand, came to writing late, and I start a story, sometimes with as little as a single sentence, and having little if any idea of the path my characters will take to get to their happy ever after. I had to learn to trust that my way was okay. It works for me and that’s the only thing that matters.

Related to this point is not comparing your journey to, and through, publication with anyone else’s. To quote from the Wear Sunscreen song, The race is long, and in the end, it’s only with yourself.”

Visit Sandra Hyatt’s website
Purchase Sandra’s upcoming release, His Bride For The Taking

Writer Tip: NJ Walters

“Revision is your friend. Nobody writes a perfect first draft. It’s in the rewrites where you turn an ordinary story into something special. Don’t be so in love with your words that you’re afraid to cut them. If they don’t serve the story, they have to go. It doesn’t matter how beautiful they are or how hard you worked to make them perfect. An author has to be fearless, unafraid to slash their work with a red pen. It’s part of the process. Personally, I enjoy the rewriting stage. The story is written, but it’s at this point where you get to refine your ideas, catch your mistakes and polish your manuscript.”

Visit NJ Walter’s website.
Purchase NJ Walter’s latest release, Embroidered Fantasies

Writer Tip: Kate Pearce

“One of the most important things I’ve learned during my years trying to get published is that things in publishing happen very fast or very, very slowly. Sometimes I was so keen to follow up on a lead or a request that I’d forget to take a deep breath, read through my work one more time, and properly research who I was sending the manuscript to. I’m sure most of us have done that. We’re so keen to be published that we treat it as a sprint rather than the marathon a writing career really is. I’ve learned to take my time. Editors and agents are horrendously busy people so it’s worth waiting until your manuscript is as good as you can get it at that point in your writing experience, before you send it out. They usually won’t notice if you take that extra week.”

Visit Kate Pearce’s website at www.katepearce.com
Purchase one of Kate’s recent or upcoming releases – Simply Insatiable or Some Like It Rough

Writer Tip: Emily Bryan

“Figure out what kind of story you want to tell and stick to it. Cross too many genre barriers and the booksellers won’t know where to shelve you. Begin as you mean to continue. If you start out with snarky comedy, don’t end up with a chainsaw toting serial killer. Remember the movie Fargo? It was both hysterical and horrific. And confusing. A reader doesn’t like those sorts of surprises. If you’re naturally drawn to dark, angsty tales, don’t try to add humor. If wit fizzes out of you like a shaken soda, don’t try to write a serious story. Stay true to your own voice.”

Visit Emily Bryan’s website. (Emily has 7 pages of writing advice under the WRITE STUFF tab!)
Purchase Emily Byran’s latest release, Stroke of Genius.

Writer Tip: Brenna Lyons

“Don’t worry about the distractions. I don’t mean telling the kids not to interrupt your writing time unless there is fire or blood. I mean the writing-borne distractions. Don’t spend your time worrying about the perfect opening line or scene, the perfect title, the perfect market… Don’t spend your time worrying about which genre fits your book best. Don’t spend your time editing and rewriting what you’ve got done. Leave all of that until the fist draft is done and then go back and do those things. While you’re allowing yourself to be distracted by the nits that you don’t need with an early draft, half the book could already be written.”

Brenna Lyons, author of the EPIC’s e-Book Award-winning TIME CURRENTS

Writer Tip: Larissa Ione

“Celebrate everything. Probably seems like a strange writing tip, but in this business we take a lot of knocks and hard hits. It’s important to keep your spirits up, and one way to do that is to keep a bottle of champagne (or whatever you celebrate with) handy at all times. I always keep a bottle of champagne chilled, and I’ve done it since before I was published. If you’re aspiring to be published, celebrate every milestone — finishing the book, sending off your first query letter, getting your first manuscript request, finaling in your first contest, etc. If you are published, celebrate getting your first cover, your first release day, getting your first great review, making your first foreign sale…and then keep on celebrating everything. More foreign sales, more covers, more contracts, hitting lists…everything. There is so little in this business that we can control…so we need to grab every opportunity to celebrate and remember why we’re writing!”

Visit Larissa Ione’s website at www.larissaione.com
Read a release from Larissa – Ecstasy Unveiled or The Mammoth Book of Special Ops Romance

Writer Tip: Abby Wood

“The best tip given to me when I started my writing career is…BE PROFESSIONAL. From your first query letter to your follow-up thank you that you send after receiving a rejection. Publishers, editors, and reviewers will remember how professional you acted. You want them to know that you take your job seriously. Remember: You want to leave doors open. Don’t give them a chance to slam the door with diva-like behavior.”

Visit Abby Wood’s website at www.authorabbywood.com
Purchase Abby’s latest release, Throwing a Kink in the Kidnapping.

Writer Tip: Vivi Andrews

“My advice is to give yourself permission to suck when you’re generating the first draft. You can worry about making it beautiful and flawless in revisions, but the first draft isn’t meant to be perfect. I know if I don’t give myself permission to write dreck, my overachiever tendencies will kick in and I will spend all my time revising and rewriting that first chapter, never getting out of the starting gate. So instead I braindump the entire first draft onto the page, fully expecting it to be unreadable. And strangely enough, when I start revising, I often find it needs much less fixing than I thought it would.”

Visit Vivi Andrews’ website at www.viviandrews.com
Purchase one of Vivi’s releases – Serengeti Storm or Shifting Dreams