Adventure into Romance with Shelley Munro
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January 23rd, 2009
Romance on the Web.

Today I have a selection of interesting tidbits for you from the world wide web.

The first is at Romancing the Blog and it’s about books and censorship. This post shocked me. I dislike censorship of any sort and feel that adults should have freedom of choice. I can borrow erotic romances at my local library. They’re labeled with large stickers that state the book contains explicit content. It’s my choice to check out a book with spicy content. I presume this also alerts the librarian if a minor tries to check one out. That’s all the oldies need on their library books – a sticker stating the book contains salty language or explicit content. They can then choose to read a particular book or leave it on the shelf.

Emily at EREC has a post about Everything Old. It’s about the universal problems faced by authors. They’re ageless problems!

I’m blogging over at The Samhellion about Sleeping with the Fishes and routine. I forgot to mention it yesterday. Oops!

Sign up to receive a free copy of Night Hawk, a short story by Lora Leigh.

Download a free copy of Roxanne St. Claire’s Bullet Catcher novella.

And of course, if you haven’t checked out my free reads, go there straight away!

Do you have any interesting posts to share?

11 comments to “Romance on the Web.”

  1. I am so with you on censorship, Shelley. We should be free to read whatever we choose. Good luck on blogging with the fishes today! Hmm, the best blog post I’ve had recently on my blog? I think it was on Sat. Nov. 22, when Rhonda Dove talked to everyone about protecting our work.


  2. That was a great post, Kaye. Very informative.


  3. :grin: Thanks for the links. Some very interesting sites!

    Rhonda :razz:


  4. Thank you for the links!
    And I’m going to go check out your post at the Samhain blog.


  5. Thanks for the nifty links Shelley! I was blown away by the post on censorship…GRRR…since I work in a public library this issue is near and dear to my heart.


  6. Cheryl – I was shocked, too. I really dislike censorship like this. I figure old-age pensioners have earned the right to read whatever they like!


  7. I broke my hip last year and was stuck in a rehab place that only had one small cart for their books. I wondered about their sensorship.


  8. I was very interested to read the post about censorship in a retirement home. I am afraid though that it didn’t really surprise me. I have found in my years of living that there are WAY too many people who feel they have the right to decide what is ‘best’ for everyone, and are not in the least interested in anyone else’s idea of what they should be ‘allowed’ to do. I wonder if the Christian Bible is allowed on those shelves–after all, it has some pretty steamy passages!


  9. Thank you for the story spots.
    I too believe that anything should go. We do not need to censure reading material. As you said, a sticker or even a rating system similar to those for movies or television to warn of explicit content, violence , language etc.. It is up to parents to moniter their children and adults should be allowed the freedom to choose what they want to read.


  10. I’m off to chase these links… but before I do, I, too, shun censorship. Makes my hackles go up.
    We’re pretty lucky in Canada. There is no ‘official’ banned book lists, though there is an unofficial ‘not recommended for school or public libraries’ list. Though it is up to the library itself to decide.


  11. Is it the joke of the universe to have the country most known for free speech also be the country most plagued by self-appointed culture censors? Can you say, founded by Puritans, anyone?